November 1-2 , 2016: San Diego, CA

2016 Agenda

 

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

12:00 PM REGISTRATION

2:00 PM WELCOME

Alan Murray, Editor-in-Chief, Fortune and Chief Content Officer, Time Inc.

2:05 PM SETTING THE AGENDA: THE CONVERGENCE OF BIG DATA AND BIOLOGY

Co-chairs David Agus, MD, professor of medicine and engineering and founding director of the Lawrence J. Ellison Institute for Transformative Medicine at University of Southern California, and Clifton Leaf, Fortune deputy editor, frame the key issues for Fortune Brainstorm HEALTH. Why isn’t disruption coming faster to health care despite all the new technologies at our fingertips? And, as America votes for a new president in less than a week, how do we make sure that our enormous health care challenges and opportunities play a larger role in the national conversation?
Dr. David B. Agus, Co-chair, Fortune Brainstorm HEALTH; Professor of Medicine and Engineering; Founding Director and CEO, Lawrence J. Ellison Institute for Transformative Medicine, USC
Clifton Leaf, Co-chair, Brainstorm HEALTH; Deputy Editor, Fortune

2:15 PM CHALLENGING THE OBVIOUS: WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE HEALTHY?

For years, ignorance was bliss when it came to our health. But today, big data is allowing us to ask questions we never thought to ask when it comes to the question of what it means to be healthy. If we can now take a blood test and see our entire molecular profile and risk for developing diseases like Alzheimer’s or cancer years ahead of time, how does this change the definition of health itself? What we can do today has led to a host of unanswered questions about what we should do: How can big data help us personalize disease prevention and wellness? Should businesses have access to such personal information about their employees? And, on a personal level, does having such data truly give us the wisdom we need to make the right choices?
Dr. Dana Goldman, Leonard D. Schaeffer Chair and Director, Schaeffer Center for Health Policy and Economics USC
Dr. Kathy L. Hudson, Deputy Director for Science, Outreach, and Policy, National Institutes of Health
James Park, Co-founder, Chairman, President, and CEO, Fitbit
Sue Siegel, Chief Executive Officer, GE Ventures and healthymagination
Moderator: Dr. David B. Agus, Co-chair, Fortune Brainstorm HEALTH; Professor of Medicine and Engineering; Director, Lawrence J. Ellison Institute for Transformative Medicine, USC

2:50 PM FROM 3D TO AI TO VR: TECHNOLOGIES TRANSFORMING MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS

Technology breakthroughs are now affecting every part of our lives, including self-driving cars, Internet access, and most importantly, our health care. New advances in the world of sensors, chips, hardware devices, swallowable cameras, 3D printing, artificial organs, data mining technologies, and more could help us diagnose diseases earlier, provide better treatments to patients, and even ease things like chronic pain and depression. What are the groundbreaking technologies that we could one day see in hospitals and clinics across the world? How far away are we from seeing widespread use of some of these futuristic ideas in our daily medical care?
Dr. Anthony Atala, Director, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine; Chair of Urology, Wake Forest School of Medicine
Jonathan Bush,
Chief Executive Officer, athenahealth, Inc.
Deborah DiSanzo, General Manager, IBM Watson Health
Moderator: Leena Rao, Senior Writer and Co-chair, MPW Next Gen, Fortune

3:20 PM DEMO: HARNESSING THE POWER OF VIRTUAL REALITY TO TREAT AND HEAL

Virtual reality is not just for gaming anymore. One of the most compelling uses of this new technology has been in medicine, where augmented vision can put a doctor in the middle of a complicated surgery—or a patient in an alternate universe that may promote healing. How can VR help treat pain? Our chilling demo has some answers.
Howard Rose, Founder and CEO, Deepstream VR

3:35 PM BREAK

4:00 PM WIPING OUT ALZHEIMER’S: THE RACE FOR A CURE POWERED BY WOMEN’S BRAINS

The Alzheimer’s tsunami is coming. More than 5 million Americans are currently living with the disease, and that number is expected to triple by 2050, placing a staggering burden on society. And nowhere does this burden weigh heavier than on the shoulders of women, who make up two-thirds of all Americans with Alzheimer’s, as well as the majority of unpaid caregivers for family and friends living with this disease. While a race for the cure is on, what can millions of Americans do today to prevent the onset of this debilitating disease? What does new research need to focus on? And what can be learned from women’s brains?
Dr. Roberta Diaz Brinton, Director, Center for Innovation in Brain Science,University of Arizona Health Sciences
Maria Shriver, Journalist; Founder, The Women’s Alzheimer’s Movement
Moderator:  Dr. David B. Agus, USC

4:25 PM TWO TECH BREAKTHROUGHS IN TEN MINUTES

Dr. Rachel Haurwitz, Co-founder, President and CEO, Caribou BioSciences, Inc.
Micah Winkelspecht, Founder and CEO, Gem
Moderator:
Adam Lashinsky, Fortune

4:35 PM STOPPING GLOBAL PANDEMICS BEFORE THEY START

Just a few months after the 2015 outbreak of Ebola was contained, another virus—called Zika—commanded the public stage. It took but 14 months after Zika’s first detection in Brazil for the virus to spread through Latin America and the Caribbean to Florida. So far, the threat has gone unchecked. And to be sure, after Zika, will come another global pathogenic threat—one, that public health experts worry, may do an even better job of outsmarting and overwhelming us. The question is whether technological advances can help us turn the odds. Can big data and genomic virus sequencing help us track emerging diseases, contain their spread and ultimately find antidotes for the next unknown pathology? Can it speed up the hunt for lifesaving vaccinations or drugs? The answers have an urgency like few others.
Dr. Bruce Gellin, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health and Director, National Vaccine Program Office, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)
Dr. Michael T. Osterholm,  Director, Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, University of Minnesota
Dr. Moncef Slaoui, Chairman, Vaccines, GlaxoSmithKline PLC
Moderator:  Bryan Walsh, International Editor, Time

5:00 PM UNPACK: A GUIDED MEDITATION WITH DEEPAK CHOPRA

Dr. Deepak Chopra, Founder, The Chopra Foundation and Co-founder, The Chopra Center for Wellbeing

5:20 PM SPEEDING UP DRUG INNOVATION

Over the past three decades, the Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development has estimated both the cost and the years it takes for companies to develop new medicines. In all that time, both measures have only risen. It now requires, on average, over a billion dollars of investment and upwards of a decade to move a new drug from discovery to commercialization. The question is: Why?  Why does consumer technology follow Moore’s Law—getting more powerful and cheaper each year—and biotechnology do the opposite? And how can we change this strange paradigm? Artificial intelligence and machine learning may help us speed up the process—but are we missing a more obvious fix?
Amrit Chaudhuri, Co-founder and CEO, Mass Innovation Labs
Dr. Lesley Stolz, Head, JLABS California
Dr. Jonathan Usuka, Knowledge Expert, McKinsey & Company
Moderator: Adam Lashinsky, Assistant Managing Editor and Editorial Director, Brainstorm TECH, Fortune

5:45 PM THE SCIENCE OF AGING

Everyone wants to live longer. And medical science is racing to figure out ways not only how to extend lives, but also to improve them as we age. Thanks to recent breakthroughs in understanding about how aging happens at the cellular level, we are now closer than ever to both goals. Consider telomeres, the mysterious protective “caps” on chromosomes that play a role in both aging and cancer—and which get smaller over time, leaving the DNA in those strands unprotected. Can we stop the shrinkage—and what are the implications if we do?
Dr. Elizabeth Blackburn, President, The Salk Institute
Interviewer: Clifton Leaf, Fortune  

6:00 PM RECEPTION

7:00 PM DINNER

Hosted by IBM Watson Health

WELCOME:
Deborah DiSanzo, General Manager, IBM Watson Health

REVOLUTIONIZING WELLNESS IN THE WORKPLACE:  DINNER AND DISCUSSION WITH ARIANNA HUFFINGTON
The queen of new media has set out to help teach companies how to transform the office into a sanctuary for well-being. David Agus sits down with Huffington for a free-flowing discussion about her new company, Thrive Global, and about whether the American worker can ever fully de-stress.
Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global
Interviewer: Dr. David B. Agus, USC

9:00 PM CLOSE

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

7:45 AM CONCURRENT BREAKFASTS: SOLUTION SESSIONS

CAN YOUR WEARABLE PREDICT YOUR HEART ATTACK?
Personal Wellness Track
Your wearable device can keep track of the calories you consume, your racing pulse as you run, the steps you take in any given hour. But, can it prevent atrial fibrillation? Can it warn of an imminent stroke? Can it identify those at risk of diabetes, depression or domestic abuse? And if so, can it summon help with enough warning time that it makes a difference? Here is an in-depth, what’s-possible-now discussion when it comes to how the technology we wear can potentially save our lives.
Firestarters:
Dr. Dave Albert, Founder and Chief Medical Officer, AliveCor
John Carlson
, President, Medical Solutions, Flex
Dr. David C. Rhew, Chief Medical Officer and Head, Health Care and Fitness, Samsung Electronics America, Inc.
Dr. Eric Topol, Professor of Genomics, Scripps Research Institute; Director, Scripps Translational Science Institute
Moderator: Leena Rao, Fortune

THE BIOPSY’S DANGEROUS CASCADE: HOW TO LESSEN THE NEED FOR INVASIVE TESTING
Intervention Track Hosted By: Insigniam
Current medical tests are too often marred by high rates of overdiagnosis (“false positive” results) or they too often miss the danger altogether (“false negatives”). Many common tests today are neither sensitive enough to catch disease-in-the-making or specific enough in their assessments, leading to a raft of follow-up tests and procedures. The testing “industry” is utterly ripe for disruption—but can new technologies truly do a better job than the current crop of lab tests and imaging scans? Several new tools, claim their inventors, can do just that—accurately diagnosing everything from the flu to Alzheimer’s and HIV. Here, sorting the hype from the reality.
Firestarters:
Dr. Igor Barani, Chief Executive Officer, Enlitic
Dr. Elad Gil, Co-founder and CEO, Color
Mark Jacobstein, Chief User Engagement Officer, Guardant Health
Dr. Crystal Mackall, Co-leader, Stand Up To Cancer-St. Baldrick’s Foundation Pediatric Cancer Dream Team and Associate Director, Stanford Cancer Institute; Co-medical Director, Standford Laboratory for Cell and Gene Medicine
Dr. Gabriel Otte, Co-founder and CEO, Freenome Inc.
Moderator: Clifton Leaf, Fortune
Introduction: Nathan Rosenberg, Founding Partner, Insigniam

SYNTHETIC BIOLOGY: REPROGRAMMING THE CELL
Research Track
Few can doubt that CRISPR’s gene editing technology will usher in a new age of medicine, and it seems the sky’s the limit. The ability to precisely locate and cut out bits of DNA from live cells in plants, animals, and even humans is revolutionary. Now, there’s a growing number of biotech companies hoping to leverage the technology to bring it to market. What is the limit for CRISPR and what other diseases can this gene technology help treat? How much are these commercial applications of CRISPR worth? And what are the downstream risks associated with this genetic tinkering?
Dr. Peter Beetham, President and CEO, CIBUS
Dr. Nessan Bermingham, Founder, President, and CEO, Intellia Therapeutics
Dr. Rachel Haurwitz, Co-founder, President, and CEO, Caribou Biosciences, Inc.
Dr. Kathy L. Hudson, Deputy Director for Science, Outreach, and Policy, National Institutes of Health
Moderator: Alice Park, Time

HOW COMPANIES SHOULD INVEST IN THE HEALTHCARE REVOLUTION
Value Chain Track
In 2015, financiers invested a record $4.5 billion in companies focused on digital health. So where are venture firms, companies, and foundations placing their bets today? And what are the game-changing areas in health and medicine likely to be for the decade to come? As the old saying goes, follow the money.
Firestarters:
Christine Aylward, Managing Director Foresite Capital Management, LLC
Dr. Michelle Dipp, Co-founder and Partner, Longwood Fund and Executive Chairman, Ovascience
Dr. Francis Ho, Managing Director, Samsung Catalyst Fund
Michael Polansky, Co-founder and Director, Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy;    Chief Executive Officer, Parker Group
Dr. David Pyott , Former Chief Executive Officer, Allergan, Inc.
Moderator: Olivier Leclerc, Senior Partner, McKinsey & Co.

8:55 AM WELCOME

Clifton Leaf, Fortune

9:00 AM FOCUS ON THE BRAIN

The brain is one of the least understood organs in the human body. But in recent months, scientists have pioneered new interactive methods to unlock its secrets. How can simple tasks like driving a car or interacting at a party shed light on the inner workings of the brain? What can we learn from new techniques about treating mental health and curing debilitating diseases? And where, perhaps, is our infatuation with technology and biomedicine leading us astray?
Dr. Richard J. Caselli, Professor of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Arizona
Dr. Adam Gazzaley, Founding Director, Neuroscape; Professor in Neurology, Physiology, and Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco
Dr. Mary Lou Jepsen, Founder and CEO, Open Water
Moderator: Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Chief Medical Correspondent, CNN

9:25 AM DEMO: DIGITAL MEDICINE VIDEO GAME

A mind-blowing look at how video games might be even more effective than medicine when it comes to treating various cognitive disorders, including dementia, autism, ADHD and depression.
Dr. Adam Gazzaley, Founding Director, Neuroscape; Professor in Neurology, Physiology, and Psychiatry, University of California San Francisco
Moderator: Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Chief Medical Correspondent, CNN

9:35 AM WILL DRUG PRICES EVER FOLLOW MOORE’S LAW?

Drug prices are increasing at a faster rate than any other cost related to health care, up 10% in 2015 and 14% in 2014. These drastic increases are forcing some patients to go into debt, file for bankruptcy, or skip doses to make each prescription last longer. But there is hope, with some big companies stepping in to keep drug prices low and accessible to people who need them most. Can rolling back prices be good for the bottom line? And how do we make sure that whatever remedy (legislative or otherwise) is proposed does not discourage risk-taking and R&D investment by the creators of today’s sophisticated medicines. A thought-provoking discussion on some of the most innovative solutions around drug pricing and the companies pioneering a new way forward.
Dr. Peter Bach, Director, Center for Health Policy and Outcomes, Memorial Sloan Kettering
Dr. Steve Miller, Chief Medical Officer, Express Scripts
Dr. Vijay Pande, General Partner, Andreessen Horowitz
Moderator: Alan Murray, Time Inc.

10:00 AM REIMAGINING THE HOSPITAL

The waiting room in the doctor’s office may soon be a relic. In the not-too-distant future, say some healthcare visionaries, a patient will collect blood at home—or maybe DNA swabbed from a cheek—and send the data-packed biochip to his or her M.D. for diagnosis. We’ll use smartphones to scan for risk factors of high blood pressure or type-2 diabetes, “visit” with specialists remotely at medical kiosks—and when we do go for an in-person exam, we’ll spend the bulk of time seeing the doctor rather than reading old magazines in the waiting room. The virtual revolution, inevitably, will transform the hospital, too. So what does the new continuum of care look like across the board—and how long until we’re there?
Dr. Randall Moore, President, Mercy Virtual
Dr. Ido Schoenberg, Chairman and CEO, American Well
Dr.
Eric Topol, Professor of Genomics, Scripps Research Institute; Director, Scripps Translational Science Institute
Moderator: Alice Park, Writer, Time
Introduction: Louise McDonald, President, Healthcare, Herman Miller

10:25 AM DEMO: THE WEARABLE PATCH THAT COULD SAVE YOUR LIFE

Imagine a wearable, disposable patch that can track heart activity, breathing rate, temperature, movement, posture, and falls, and then alerts your doctor or hospital when something’s amiss. The future of patient monitoring is here.
Dr. Nersi Nazari, Chairman and CEO, Vital Connect
Moderator: Alice Park, Time

10:30 AM BREAK

11:00 AM YOUR SECOND BRAIN

Nestled in your gut is a so-called second brain. Called the enteric nervous system, it is made up of 100 million neurons that live in the walls of the digestive system and is responsible for many of the reflexes and processes that make our bodies work. It’s also linked with many of our emotions (think: stomach butterflies). Now, researchers are trying to understand how changes to the microbiome—the trillions of bacteria that also live in our digestive tracts—affect that gut “gray matter.” It’s a collision of worlds, in some ways, tailor-made for our new scientific tools.
Dr. Jessica Richman, Co-founder and CEO, uBiome
Julie Smolyansky, President and CEO, Lifeway Foods
Moderator: Michal Lev-Ram, Senior Writer and Co-chair, MPW Next Gen and Brainstorm TECH, Fortune

11:20 AM DEMO: WATSON TAKES ON CANCER

Watson for Oncology is designed to help oncologists anywhere make evidence informed decisions based on clinical knowledge. Oncologists may have time constraints that affect their making ever increasingly complex assessments of the patients that are presenting amid the rapidly evolving clinical knowledge. Watson for Oncology provides clinicians a dynamic patient summary constructed from insights garnered from both structured and unstructured clinical information and present ranked treatment recommendations.
Robert S. Merkel, Vice President of Oncology, IBM Watson Health
Moderator: Clifton Leaf, Fortune

11:35 AM WE’VE GOT TO TALK ABOUT THE DOLLARS

Any conversation about disruptive new technologies, innovation in medicine, or our unprecedented health care delivery system is incomplete unless we also talk about money. How do we rethink from top-to-bottom what providing value really means? What kinds of tools can best measure outcomes and help medical providers decide when any medical intervention is worth it? With precision medicine come costly targeted therapies and super-expensive drugs that will break the bank with an aging population. What will it take to begin pricing healthcare procedures based on the value they deliver, not on what the market can bear—and are there tools available now to get us closer to this goal?
Dr. Vivian S. Lee, Dean, School of Medicine; Senior Vice President, Health Sciences; CEO, University of Utah Health Care, University of Utah
Dr. Jonathan Woodson, Faculty Director, Institute for Health System Innovation, Boston University School of Medicine
Moderator: Adam Lashinsky, Fortune

12:00 PM THE OTHER SIX BILLION

Innovations in medicine and medical technology are designed to serve the 600 million people living in the most developed countries, and that’s who they typically benefit. But what about the other 6 billion? That is to say, those who live in places where infectious diseases—including malaria, tuberculosis and HIV—still kill an astounding 15 million people a year. Even health issues more commonly associated with the West, such as obesity, type-2 diabetes and heart disease, are rising fast in developing nations—faster than their health systems can handle them. How do we bring healthcare disruption to the places that need it most? A frank discussion on the new planet-focused approach to medical care.
Dr. Seth Berkley, Chief Executive Officer, Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance
Sir Andrew Witty, Chief Executive Officer, GlaxoSmithKline PLC
Moderator: Clifton Leaf, Fortune

12:25 PM DEMO: THE $80 ARTIFICIAL KNEE IMPROVING LIVES AROUND THE GLOBE

30 million people globally need mobility devices like prosthetics. A look at how one low-cost — but high-performance — artificial knee has already changed the lives of more than 7,000 amputees in more than a dozen countries.
Dr. Krista Donaldson, Chief Executive Officer, D-Rev: Design Revolution

12:30 PM SWITCH BREAK

12:40 PM CONCURRENT LUNCHES: SOLUTION SESSIONS

THE EXERCISE CURE: THE HIGH-TECH SCIENCE OF FITNESS
Personal Wellness Track
Ask the average person why exercise is important and you’ll hear “because it’s good for you.” No wonder, then, so many people don’t bother doing it. A rationale so vague and uninspiring can’t possibly motivate the average person to jumpstart their activity. But advances in fitness tracking and physiological research have shed new light on the benefits of a body in motion. Exercise, even very little of it at a time, appears to slow aging at the cellular level—so much so that, if it could be bottled as a drug, it would be the most successful pharmaceutical ever developed. So what’s the best way to motivate the 80% of Americans who don’t exercise to start? Hint: The answer isn’t on your current fitness tracker.
Firestarters:
Stacey Burr, Vice President, Wearable Sports Electronics, adidas
John Foley, Co-founder and CEO, Peloton                           
Suze Yalof Schwartz, Founder and CEO, unplug meditation
Moderator: Alice Park, Time

HELP FROM AFAR: THE POWER OF REMOTE HEALTHCARE
Intervention Track Hosted By: Insigniam
Mobile technology is enabling doctors and patients to meet anytime and anywhere. Thanks to advances in telemedicine, physicians—even psychiatrists—can now monitor patients and do the kind of detailed patient workups and counseling that had once been possible only in an in-person visit. In theory, it’s easier for patients, it’s cheaper for healthcare systems, and the results (in early testing) seem just as good. So what’s stopping us from making remote healthcare the norm, especially for those with chronic diseases who need frequent monitoring? And how can other Uber-like platforms (doctors on demand) improve cost, efficiency, and the quality of care as well?
Firestarters:
Hill Ferguson, Chief Executive Officer, Doctor On Demand
Suneel Gupta, Head of Mobile, One Medical
Ron Gutman, Founder and CEO, HealthTap
Dr. Vivian S. Lee, Dean, School of Medicine; Senior Vice President, Health Sciences; CEO, University of Utah Health Care, University of Utah
Rick Valencia, President, Qualcomm Life, Qualcomm Inc.
Moderator: Leena Rao, Fortune
Introduction: Shideh Bina, Founding Partner, Insigniam

REINVENTING THE CLINICAL TRIAL
Research Track
Traditional clinical trials ask one question: Does an experimental treatment work better than nothing at all—or, the very least, the standard therapy offered patients. The problem is, in the current age of molecularly targeted medicines, we have too many questions to ask: Does a specific new drug, for instance, work well in one specific patient with one specific genetic mutation—and does it work better than a slew of other new targeted drugs? Luckily, there are better alternatives. One type of “adaptive” trial lets researchers ask questions as they go along—and get answers faster. We explore this revolutionary approach as it tries to solve the mysteries of one of the deadliest diseases in man: the brain cancer called glioblastoma multiforme.
Firestarters:
Dr. Anna Barker, Director, Transformative Healthcare Networks, Co-director, Complex Adaptive Systems, Professor, School of Life Science, Arizona State University
Dr. Donald A. Berry, Professor, Department of Biostatistics, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas
Matthew De Silva, Founder, Notable Labs
Dr. Clifford A. Hudis, Chief Executive Officer, American Society of Clinical Oncology
Moderator: Clifton Leaf, Fortune

21ST-CENTURY DETECTION AND PREVENTION
Value Chain Track 
As the burden of chronic ailments increases along with our aging populations, public health experts are in near-universal agreement that we need to a far better job of preventing disease. Another area of agreement? Targeted early care, smarter use of population-based data, and new technologies can help us get there. Our breakout participants get a primer in what the next generation of tech-driven looks like and explore the limits of what diseases we can truly forestall–and for how long?
Firestarters:
Dawn Barry, Vice President, Applied Genomics Illumina, Inc.
Colin Hill, Co-founder, Chairman, and CEO, GNS Healthcare
Peter Ohnemus, President and CEO, dacadoo ag
Andy Page, President, 23andMe.com
Blair Palmer, Partnerships Coordinator, Office of Innovation, UNICEF
Dr. Buzz Stewart, Vice President and Chief Research Officer, Sutter Health
Moderator: Michal Lev-Ram, Fortune

1:50 PM SWITCH BREAK

2:00 PM PAIN: THE EPIDEMIC NEXT DOOR

More than 18,000 people died from opioid overdoses in the U.S. in 2014—an epidemic that the CDC has compared to the spread of HIV in the early 1980s. But can new tech and data-based solutions help to ease the crisis? By tracking irregular patterns of opioid prescription, for instance, it’s possible to pinpoint where overdoses are occurring and perhaps intervene. And electronic prescriptions can add an extra layer of security, making it difficult to illegally obtain and prescribe painkillers. Tracking opioid abuse, though, is only part of the challenge. Equally important is addressing the problem that leads many people to seek drug relief in the first place: their chronic pain. A vicious cycle; a candid discussion.

Josh Gray, Vice President, athenaResearch, athenahealth
Shaun Rahimi, Chief Executive Officer, Enso
Howard Rose, Founder and CEO, Deepstream VR
Behshad Sheldon, Chief Executive Officer, Braeburn Pharmaceuticals
Dr. Anne Schuchat, Principal Deputy Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Moderator: Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Chief Medical Correspondent, CNN

2:40 PM BIG DATA AND CANCER: STANDARDIZATION

Can big data really help us solve the oldest and cruelest riddle in the history of medicine? It’s a question that has tantalized many researchers, both public and private, as they try to glean insights from an ever-expanding and unruly stash of molecular and clinical information. Companies have shown how analyzing their own data streams can help them fix failures in customer service, speed up shipping, and price more dynamically. But biology is far more complex (and far less understood) than business. What will it take to master this new biodigital system? How do we standardize cancer-related data that comes in a Babel of terminology and from disparate platforms. And even if we can, is this the best way forward?
Dr. Clifford A. Hudis, Chief Executive Officer, American Society of Clinical Oncology
Greg Simon, Executive Director, Cancer Moonshot Task Force, The White House
Dr. Ken Robert Smith, Distinguished Professor of Family Studies and Population Science; Director, Utah Population Database, University of Utah
Moderator: Clifton Leaf, Fortune

3:05 PM DATA-DRIVEN MEDICINE: APRES LE DELUGE

With trillions of terabytes of health data created every day, healthcare is adapting to the world of big data. The question is how new companies and old institutions can extract value from patient and medical data to help take healthcare to a new level. Big data is already helping to personalize medicine, predict epidemics, streamline treatments and even prevent deaths, but what’s next? What are some of the new, data-driven technologies technologies that can radically change medicine? And when it comes to using all of this data in making medical decisions, where are the limits?
Dr. Amy P. Abernethy, Chief Medical Officer, Chief Scientific Officer, and Senior Vice President, Oncology, Flatiron Health
Dr. Kyu Rhee, Chief Health Officer and Vice President, IBM
Dr. B. Vindell Washington, National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Moderator: Michal Lev-Ram, Fortune

3:30 PM BREAK

3:45 PM DEMO: THE FUTURE OF HEALTH SENSORS

Wearable devices can do more than just collect vital signs. The new generation of Internet-connected sensors also hold the possibility of detecting everything from allergens in the air to an ear infection. This new crop of technologies also includes those improving healthcare across the developing world. A flash introduction to a few companies that are at the forefront of personalized health-tracking revolution.

Angela Baker, Director, Qualcomm Wireless Reach, Qualcomm Inc.
Åsa Nordgren,Founder and CEO, Trice Imaging Inc.
Kevin R. Hart, Founder and CEO, TZOA
Ruchit Nagar, Co-founder and CEO, Khushi Baby
Moderator: Adam Lashinsky, Fortune

4:05 PM THE PATIENT AS INNOVATOR

Technology is changing the patient-provider relationship as never before—starting with the obvious: Consumers now have access to—and, increasingly, control over their own healthcare data. Ubiquitous medical information and research studies on the web, engaged online communities, smartphone apps, and even at-home diagnostics, have given rise to a new breed of empowered healthcare consumers. And these patients are impatient: prodding white-coats for faster, better answers—or, sometimes, seeking them on their own. To be sure, bad information and the wrong guidance are putting some lives at risk. Other patients are changing the world.
Deborah Brooks, Co-founder and Executive Vice President, The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research
Kathy Giusti,
Founder, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation & Consortium
Sean Lane, CEO and Co-Founder, Crosschx
Claudia Williams, Senior Advisor, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy
Moderator: Rik Kirkland, Partner, Global Publishing, McKinsey & Co.

4:40 PM A CONVERSATION WITH SEAN PARKER: LESSONS FROM A MASTER OF DISRUPTION

How can we use the technology we have right now to change healthcare for the better—to transform a bureaucratic, hidebound, risk-averse, and largely closed system into one that’s responsive to the consumers who are paying for it? Who else to answer that question but Sean Parker, the man who understands creative disruption better than anyone. Setting his sights on hacking the toughest challenge of all—cancer—the co-founder of Napster, founding president of Facebook, and president of the Parker Foundation has already accomplished something miraculous in a few years’ time: getting the nation’s top cancer immunology experts to work together toward a common goal. We talk with Parker about what he’s learned along the journey—and where we should go from here.
Sean Parker, President, The Parker Foundation
Moderator: Clifton Leaf, Fortune

5:05 PM ADJOURN AND CLOSING RECEPTION